Top 10 Books to Read About Hungary, Part III

Fiction and food, they go together, don’t they? Read a disturbing story of youth set in Budapest in the early 1900s, and then find out all about the origins and nature of Hungarian cuisine…

5. The Paul Street Boys, by Ferenc Molnár.  This youth novel is often referred to as the best-known Hungarian work of fiction. It’s about a gang of boys defending their “grund,” a small patch of urban territory, against the “redshirts.” A story of struggle in the ‘hood, this 1906 book is often cited as an illustration of nationalism, and a premonition of the outbreak of the First World War. Its hero, Nemecsek, has been compared with Tom Sawyer and Oliver Twist. Regardless of how you interpret it, it is a true classic. You can get to know the “boys” better by visiting them in District VIII on Práter utca 11 (see photo). They arrived there in 2007…

6. The Food and Wine Lover’s Guide to Hungary, by Carolyn Bánfalvi. This is the book about Hungarian cuisine and wine. Figure out  what to buy at the piac (market), find out what grape varieties are unique to Hungary, discover the origins of paprika and so much more in the culinary dictionary, and savor (virtually, anyway) Hungarian sweets. If you find yourself hungry for more, find Carolyn and her husband at www.tastehungary.com and they will personally introduce you to the wonders of Hungarian cuisine and wine!

A hint for tomorrow – one book has Hell in the title, the other one Lost. Have you ever heard Hungarians are pessimistic? See you tomorrow!

 

About adriknows

One day, people looking for tips on life in Budapest started coming to me. Friends, then friends of friends, and so on. People were telling newcomers and longtime Budapesters alike, “Adri knows!” Now it’s time to share what I’ve picked up over more than a decade of fun-and-frequently-frazzled family life in the big BP.
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